(Source: acidiix, via nopesexual)

kenobi-wan-obi:

Universe Is Made Of Math, Cosmologist Says

Scientists have long used mathematics to describe the physical properties of the universe. But what if the universe itself is math? That’s what cosmologist Max Tegmark believes.

In Tegmark’s view, everything in the universe — humans included — is part of a mathematical structure. All matter is made up of particles, which have properties such as charge and spin, but these properties are purely mathematical, he says. And space itself has properties such as dimensions, but is still ultimately a mathematical structure.

"If you accept the idea that both space itself, and all the stuff in space, have no properties at all except mathematical properties," then the idea that everything is mathematical "starts to sound a little bit less insane," Tegmark said in a talk given Jan. 15 here at The Bell House. The talk was based on his book "Our Mathematical Universe: My Quest for the Ultimate Nature of Reality" (Knopf, 2014).

Nature is full of math

The idea follows the observation that nature is full of patterns, such as the Fibonacci sequence, a series of numbers in which each number is the sum of the previous two numbers. The flowering of an artichoke follows this sequence, for example, with the distance between each petal and the next matching the ratio of the numbers in the sequence.

The nonliving world also behaves in a mathematical way. If you throw a baseball in the air, it follows a roughly parabolic trajectory. Planets and other astrophysical bodies follow elliptical orbits.

"There’s an elegant simplicity and beauty in nature revealed by mathematical patterns and shapes, which our minds have been able to figure out," said Tegmark, who loves math so much he has framed pictures of famous equations in his living room.

One consequence of the mathematical nature of the universe is that scientists could in theory predict every observation or measurement in physics. Tegmark pointed out that mathematics predicted the existence of the planet Neptune, radio waves and the Higgs boson particle thought to explain how other particles get their mass.

Some people argue that math is just a tool invented by scientists to explain the natural world. But Tegmark contends the mathematical structure found in the natural world shows that math exists in reality, not just in the human mind.

And speaking of the human mind, could we use math to explain the brain?

Mathematics of consciousness

Some have described the human brain as the most complex structure in the universe. Indeed, the human mind has made possible all of the great leaps in understanding our world.

Someday, Tegmark said, scientists will probably be able to describe even consciousness using math. (Carl Sagan is quoted as having said, "the brain is a very big place, in a very small space.")

"Consciousness is probably the way information feels when it’s being processed in certain, very complicated ways," Tegmark said. He pointed out that many great breakthroughs in physics have involved unifying two things once thought to be separate: energy and matter, space and time, electricity and magnetism. He said he suspects the mind, which is the feeling of a conscious self, will ultimately be unified with the body, which is a collection of moving particles.

But if the brain is just math, does that mean free will doesn’t exist, because the movements of particles could be calculated using equations? Not necessarily, he said.

One way to think of it is, if a computer tried to simulate what a person will do, the computation would take at least the same amount of time as performing the action. So some people have suggested defining free will as an inability to predict what one is going to do before the event occurs.

But that doesn’t mean humans are powerless. Tegmark concluded his talk with a call to action: "Humans have the power not only to understand our world, but to shape and improve it."

(via fractalvisionz)

by Vincent Castiglia - existential visionary artist

http://vincentcastigliaart.com/

(Source: vepartyinmyhead, via microcosmicmorganism)

open-eyes-and-clear-blue-skies:

aradia-in-the-tardis:

kateitron:

hollywoodforthebirds:

thinkhappythoughtsornot:

kaeleeb:

fuckyeahitssummeralexis:

honestly the most beautiful thing i’ve ever read

….whut.
Well, shit.



Damn

meh, meh, mEH, MEH, MEH, MEH, MEH, MEH, MEH, MEH, MEH, MEH!!!!!!!!


theres a time and a place for mucking around 

What book dude I need to read it

open-eyes-and-clear-blue-skies:

aradia-in-the-tardis:

kateitron:

hollywoodforthebirds:

thinkhappythoughtsornot:

kaeleeb:

fuckyeahitssummeralexis:

honestly the most beautiful thing i’ve ever read

….whut.

Well, shit.

image

Damn

meh, meh, mEH, MEH, MEH, MEH, MEH, MEH, MEH, MEH, MEH, MEH!!!!!!!!

theres a time and a place for mucking around

What book dude I need to read it

(Source: idancee, via nopesexual)

sixpenceee:

Déjà Vu

Déjà vu is the experience of being certain that you have experienced or seen a new situation previously – you feel as though the event has already happened or is repeating itself.

The experience is usually accompanied by a strong sense of familiarity and a sense of eeriness, strangeness, or weirdness. The “previous” experience is usually attributed to a dream, but sometimes there is a firm sense that it has truly occurred in the past.

Déjà Vécu

Déjà vécu is what most people are experiencing when they think they are experiencing deja vu.

Déjà vu is the sense of having seen something before, whereas déjà vécu is the experience of having seen an event before, but in great detail – such as recognizing smells and sounds. 

Déjà Visité

Déjà visité is a less common experience and it involves an uncanny knowledge of a new place. For example, you may know your way around a a new town or a landscape despite having never been there, and knowing that it is impossible for you to have this knowledge. 

Déjà Senti

Déjà senti is the phenomenon of having “already felt” something. This is exclusively a mental phenomenon and seldom remains in your memory afterwards.

You could think of it as the feeling of having just spoken, but realizing that you, in fact, didn’t utter a word.

Jamais Vu

Jamais vu (never seen) describes a familiar situation which is not recognized. It is often considered to be the opposite of déjà vu and it involves a sense of eeriness. The observer does not recognize the situation despite knowing rationally that they have been there before.

Chris Moulin, of Leeds University, asked 92 volunteers to write out “door” 30 times in 60 seconds. He reported that 68% of the precipitants showed symptoms of jamais vu, such as beginning to doubt that “door” was a real word. This has lead him to believe that jamais vu may be a symptom of brain fatigue.

Presque Vu

Presque vu is very similar to the “tip of the tongue” sensation – it is the strong feeling that you are about to experience an epiphany – though the epiphany seldom comes. 

L’esprit de l’Escalier

L’esprit de l’escalier (stairway wit) is the sense of thinking of a clever comeback when it is too late. 

Capgras Delusion

Capgras delusion is the phenomenon in which a person believes that a close friend or family member has been replaced by an identical looking impostor. This could be tied in to the old belief that babies were stolen and replaced by changelings in medieval folklore, as well as the modern idea of aliens taking over the bodies of people on earth to live amongst us for reasons unknown. This delusion is most common in people with schizophrenia but it can occur in other disorders.

Fregoli Delusion

Fregoli delusion is a rare brain phenomenon in which a person holds the belief that different people are, in fact, the same person in a variety of disguises. It is often associated with paranoia and the belief that the person in disguise is trying to persecute them.

It was first reported in 1927 in the case study of a 27-year-old woman who believed she was being persecuted by two actors whom she often went to see at the theatre. She believed that these people “pursued her closely, taking the form of people she knows or meets”.

Prosopagnosia

Prosopagnosia is a phenomenon in which a person is unable to recognize faces of people or objects that they should know. People experiencing this disorder are usually able to use their other senses to recognize people – such as a person’s perfume, the shape or style of their hair, the sound of their voice, or even their gait. A classic case of this disorder was presented in the 1998 book (and later Opera by Michael Nyman) called “The man who mistook his wife for a hat”.

SOURCE

(via microcosmicmorganism)

vespertinavi:

My favorite Stephen Gammell illustrations from ‘Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark’.

(via microcosmicmorganism)

"You are not IN the universe, you ARE the universe, an intrinsic part of it. Ultimately you are not a person, but a focal point where the universe is becoming conscious of itself. What an amazing miracle."

Eckhart Tolle (via fourteendrawings)

(Source: vital-dust, via karniphery)

Aeons - Karnivool

With scenes from inception

Tags: karnivool

jonjacobsen:

FOLLOW ME
> Facebook
> Instagram
> Twitter

sur l’autre rive je t’attendrai

Sur l’autre rive j’attendrai
Des années durant
Avec l’espoir de revoir un jour
Ton éternel visage d’enfant
Dont les étranges yeux argentés
Trahissent l’âge et la sagesse.

Navigue longuement par-delà la brume
Pour regagner les abords de Pays Lumineux
Abandonnant les malheurs des vies passées
Les sourires timides et douloureux


Sur l’autre rive je t’attendrai

En la otra orilla del río te esperaré

En la otra orilla del río te esperaré
durante pasen los años
con la esperanza de volver a ver un día
tu eterna cara de niña
cuyos extraños ojos plateados
traicionan la edad y la sabiduría.
Navega largamente por la bruma
para devolvernos a las costas del País luminoso
Abandonando los problemas de vidas pasadas
las sonrisas tímidas y dolorosas
En la otra orilla del río te esperaré.

Tags: alcest

"If the doors of perception were cleansed, everything would appear
to man as it is: infinite.
For man has closed himself up, till he sees all things thro’ narrow
chinks of his cavern."

William Blake, from “Book the Second” in “Milton: A Poem in Two Books,” The Complete Poetry and Prose of William Blake, edited by Erdman, Bloom, and Golding (University of California Press, 1982)

(Source: apoetreflects)